Modern Quebec Home In Black And White

"...Isn't it quite nice how such a simple premise as having two colours as the primary design function creates such a relaxing-usable space without any particularly large intervention or change?"

Is there something all so enduring when you achieve absolute yes and no, black and white? Perhaps fantastic in theory, SATORI & SCOUT would probably propose that if a space were to ever be truly black and white then it would feel slightly nauseous and all the opposite characteristics of pleasant; however, this home located in Quebec is really quite something in terms of it’s achievement in creating a really harmonious black and white space.

Designed by Quebec City (Canada) based studios Hatem + D and Étienne Bernier, this industrial aesthetic 20th century home has been given an extension to it’s rear and the space is definitely on SATORI & SCOUT’s favourite list. Without an overabundance of budget to play with, the architects explain, “…it is entirely possible to obtain a contemporary residence with incredible spatial qualities on a tight budget, by keeping the focus on the priorities – the windows, for example – and the main goals.”

With making some of the home’s existing brickwork and cornices black, such elements were complemented with new charred lumber planks as the facade’s materiality. With the entirety of the living space bordered by large, expansive windows that each open out into the space outside (though, with all the snow, it might be best to keep these shut) the contrast in white / clear is very much obvious against the otherwise black.

Boasting such an obvious inside – outside relationship, the opening up of the interior allows it’s natural brightness to be maximised and all in all creates a seamless integration with the garden. Not wanting to make the home absolutely black and white – in black and white terms -, the flooring is suitably brown (wooden) and gives a breakaway from the super clinical aesthetic. A modern home by all means, isn’t it quite nice how such a simple premise as having two colours as the primary design function creates such a relaxing-usable space without any particularly large intervention or change?

Discover more about the architects online at: Hatem.ca

Inside And Outside (And All The Snow)

It is quite refreshing to see the inside-outside relationship being played in clearly a very cold climate. Too often do people assume such a relationship can only be achieved in warm locations and with lush settings. Quite the opposite, anywhere can achieve this.

(Photography Credit : Dave Tremblay)

9 Design
8 Originality
6.5 Culturality
7 Context
7.6

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