Light Festival Brings Orbs Of Transformation

"...Part of the Light Festival of Tadasu No Mori, the design featured ‘resonating trees’ that animated the wooded landscape..."

Interactive art and it’s message can come in various ways and light is often an aspect that is played with, whether that be for shadow, illumination, illusion or atmosphere. SATORI & SCOUT always love a beautiful cultural discovery and this immersive art installation at the ancient Shimogamo shrine in Kyoto (Japan) is certainly one to be inspired by.

Designed by TeamLab, the artists are a collective creative group that brings together professionals from various fields of practice that include artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians, architects, web and print graphic designers and editors. All of digital resonance, TeamLab refer to themselves as ‘Ultra-technologists’ and the group aim to achieve a wonderful balance of “…art, science, technology and creativity”, as TeamLab explains.

At the historic Shimogamo shrine and it’s forest until August 31st 2016 was a brilliant display of colour that certainly aroused your senses. Part of the Light Festival of Tadasu No Mori, the design featured ‘resonating trees’ that animated the wooded landscape that led visitors eagerly up to the ancient religious spot. Upon reaching the destination, ‘resonating orbs’ transformed the world heritage site into one that is certainly unique and worth immersing yourself in. A sequence of orbs, when such interacted with each other, the light colour subtly changed as they emit a musical note unique to their colour hue. Simultaneously, the orbs were able to communicate with one another, and therefore created a continually adaptive colour display that is automated by all the orb’s neighbours. Continuing throughout the forest, the art display informs us of light and how the presence or human or animal touch within a space can transform it.  As TeamLab concisely explained, “…people will become more aware of the existence of other living things in the same space.’

Discover more about the projects at

The Shimogam Shrine Of Kyoto

Located on the southern banks of the Kamo river, the Kamomioya-jinja gardens both reflect and inspires Kyoto City. A product of the city, 'Shimo-' means lower, and '-gamo' is named after the city’s central river, and together yields Shimogamo.

(Photography Credit :

7 Originality
8 Creativity
9 Culturality
9.5 Interactiveness

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *