Koda Home Versus UK Housing Crisis

"...With all intentions of shaking up the UK property market, the KODA house design encourages the self-build culture..."

Various small homes have taken SATORI & SCOUT’s interest, but many are without much purpose of change. Often the case, small homes are designed out of the idea that modern day living ought to be simpler and that first time buying prices can be high, and this home is no different; however, this home is scalable (or so they say). Estonian design collective Kodasema have launched a new pre-fabricated house idea in a bid to solve the UK’s housing crisis, where their home takes less than a day to locate and can be stacked upon one another.

Named KODA House, the unit costs just £150,000 as a package which includes the cost of planning and building regulations, as well as delivery, site preparation, installation and it’s required connections to water, electricity and sewage utilities. Without any need for foundations – well, it is its own raft foundation -, such a design is sized as such to fit on the back of a lorry to allow for its quick delivery. With all intentions of shaking up the UK property market, the KODA house design encourages the self-build culture and can be an installation that can be located in many more places than traditionally.

As outlined by the designers, Kodasema sees their design as a temporary home that could be installed as temporary housing on disused sites across London (UK), for example. Equally too, such a design could easily be fitted with a cafe, office, workshop or classroom, such is its modular unit size. As John O’Brien of Kodasema explains, “This trend of short-term use of derelict land, which can be left untouched for years, even during the planning stages, is becoming more common, especially in London.” Continuing, “KODA would provide a cost-effective option to house those on the waiting list for affordable accommodation or offer temporary rental apartments for young professionals, students and those looking to downsize.”

Powered by solar panels on its roof, the home boasts being quite a ‘smart’ object with alarms, adjustable LED lighting and climate control all included. With insulative concrete, full height windows, mezzanine bedroom and hidden bathroom, what more could a small house unit want?

Discover more about the designer and installation at: Kodasema.com

Hidden Power And Stairs

With the unit's power coming from solar panels located on its roof, is stacking really a viable option, and too, is the concrete structure that structurally-sound to accommodate several units above itself? To be truly modular, each unit ought to be over-engineered to allow for future constructions. Stairways to second floor, too?

(Photography Credit : Kodasema)

8.5 Design
6 Originality
6 Culturality
6.5 Context
6.8

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